Some U.S. physicians appear to be embracing “political eugenics” with calls to normalize preferred health care for Black and Latino patients to allegedly address structural inequities, DePaul University professor Jason Hill told “Tucker Carlson Tonight” Tuesday.

“I think for the first time, we are seeing hospitals that are being used by doctors as indoctrination centers and advancing their own politicized views that are using Critical Race Theory, which is a nefarious and quite racist kind of doctrine,” Hill told host Tucker Carlson.

Hill said doctors have been using hospitals as platforms to advance their political views on reparations and “bring it into play” by providing preferential health care based on the race of the patient.

The effort “is really an inverted racial guilt system in the hospital centers and I think … I would question whether or not they are violating the Hippocratic Oath under which they have sworn and pledged allegiance to build and construct their medical lives under,” Hill said. 

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In a Boston Review op-ed last month, Drs. Michelle Morse and Bram Wispelwey – both of whom have worked at a teaching hospital for Harvard University – called for “an antiracist approach to medicine.” While they didn’t explicitly call for “discrimination,” they criticized colorblind policies and sought racial preferences in patient admissions.

“After more than five decades of colorblind law … the stubborn persistence of racial inequities – both in health care and across society at large – gives the lie to the effectiveness of colorblind policies,” the doctors wrote. 

The initiative is driven by “people who have a particular agenda,” Hill said.

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“We have been seeing people who are for reparations and people who advance Critical Race Theory, wanting to advance a socialist system in this country and they are using the health system among other means,” he explained.

“It’s been done under the guise of humanitarianism, but like I said, it’s a guilt system, because how do you achieve equity in the medical field and the health system?”

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Hill said that while he agrees that certain demographic groups suffer disproportionately from some medical conditions, “I think the criterion that determines who gets medical help is based on the seriousness of the condition that each individual suffers.

“I’m a Black man,” Hill continued, “and if someone comes in with a dislocated shoulder, that person is treated before I’m treated, so the seriousness of the condition is a criteria, not something like appealing to identity across the board.”

Fox News’ Sam Dorman contributed to this report.