Marine Corps orders environmental, health, and safety inspections of all service barracks > United States Marine Corps Flagship > Press Release Display

Effective immediately, Marine Corps Installations Command will conduct an environmental, health, and safety inspection of all Marine Corps barracks to ensure service compliance with its commitment to its residents to provide a safe, secure, clean, and consistent living standard across the unaccompanied housing enterprise.

Marine Corps Installations Command has directed Installation Commanders to assign an E-7 or above active-duty service member or unaccompanied housing civilian equivalent outside of the chain of command to conduct the inspection, which are slated to be completed no later than March 15, 2024.

“This effort allows us to get a one-time, complete assessment of the inventory, registered in the Enterprise Military Housing system as a baseline for analysis,” said Maj. Gen. David Maxwell, MCICOM Commander. “The benefit as we transition to professional management will be that we have a point of reference for the condition of each barracks. This will enable our senior leaders to understand the totality of issues regarding their facility and get to quickly solving their problems.”

Installations commanders will use MARADMIN 289/23 Unaccompanied Housing Guarantees and Responsibilities and DoD Manual 4165.63-M DoD Housing Management Manual to ensure compliance with the Marine Corps’ commitment to its Barracks.

Barracks 2030 Overview

Unaccompanied Housing Guarantees and Resident Responsibilities

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